Archive for January, 2017

CDC Reports on Higher Death Rates in Non-Metro Areas

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

The January 13th edition of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) provides an assessment of the leading causes of death in non-metro and metro areas between 1999 and 2014, concluding that higher rates of death occur in non-metro areas of the U.S.

After calculating age-adjusted death rates and potentially excess death in metro and non-metro areas for the five leading causes of death–heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease, and stroke–the CDC concluded that more than half of all deaths (57.5%) from unintentional injury, specifically, that occur outside metro areas were potentially excess (potentially preventable). In metro areas, that rate is 39.2%.

The report suggests the higher rate of excess death in more rural areas of the country may be related to a variety of factors including less access to health care services, further distance to trauma care centers, and reduced EMS services as well as behavioral factors like physical inactivity during leisure and lower use of seat belts.

“Routine tracking of potentially excess deaths in nonmetropolitan areas might help public health departments identify emerging health problems, monitor known problems, and focus interventions to reduce preventable deaths in these areas,” the report concludes.

NTI Board Member Gibran Earns Distinguished Alumna Award

Monday, January 9th, 2017

Dr. Nicole Gibran, professor and Director of the UW Medicine Regional Burn Center at Harborview Medical Center, has been honored by colleagues in the Alumni Association of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) with its Distinguished Alumna Award. This annual award will be presented to Dr. Gibran in recognition of the significant impact she has had in the medical field on a national and global scale. The award will be presented to Dr. Gibran at BUSM in May 2017.

Dr. Gibran is a member of the NTI Board of Directors, one of many positions of prominence she holds within the medical field.

Op-ed in JAMA Surgery Decries Limited Funding for Trauma Research

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Despite significant advances made in U.S. trauma care and systems over the past 50 years, traumatic injury continues to be an unacceptable and increasing societal burden, argues Kimberly Davis, MD, in an opinion piece published in JAMA Surgery in December. Davis is a professor in the Dept. of Surgery at Yale University and a member of the executive committee of CNTR, the Coalition for National Trauma Research. The National Trauma Institute is a member of CNTR.

Davis and co-authors Timothy Fabian, MD, and William Cioffi, MD, point to the lack of a centralized national home and stable funding stream for trauma research to explain how this public health problem has reached epidemic proportions. “…[S]ince 1966 the mortality rate has increased 0.66% per year,” they say. And the annual costs are astronomical: $214 billion for fatal traumatic injury and $457 billion for non-fatal injuries, including healthcare and lost productivity.

Davis et al. consider the billions of dollars in research funding directed toward Ebola and Zika–both serious public health issues in recent years, yet neither impacting the United States to any degree–and wonder about the lack of attention paid to trauma. “It is shocking that nearly 150,000 deaths every year do not warrant a similar response.”

Read the article. (doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4625)