Archive for the ‘NASEM report’ Category

Trauma News Interview with Stewart and Winchell Captures Gist of Stakeholder Meeting on Zero Preventable Deaths

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017

Suggesting that the messaging surrounding the development of a national trauma system should shift from the traditional public health realm to the realm of national security, Dr. Ronald Stewart and Dr. Robert Winchell elaborated on the outcomes of the April meeting of stakeholders in the NASEM report on a National Trauma Care System published last year.

The broad consensus at the meeting, held in Bethesda, MD, was that “there needs to be a strong central directive, but the details need to be worked out locally,” said Winchell. Following establishment at a federal level, he said, “The actual nuts and bolts of the system would be developed by a broad coalition of the providers of the trauma community.”

Dr. Stewart also noted that trauma deaths occurring before the victim arrives at a hospital need to be explored if the goal of Zero Preventable Deaths after Injury is to be realized. “People recognize that if we’re going to get to zero preventable deaths, we have to know what those deaths are and when they occur. That would impact, for example, where you might put EMS resources or what you might do to improve access.”

Another gap in understanding is long-term outcomes for those suffering trauma. “We need to try to work towards data linkage to get more information on those prehospital deaths and also on long-term outcomes after somebody leaves the hospital or leaves a rehabilitation center,” explained Stewart.

“While you might argue that the NASEM report argues for some major revolutionary changes in how things are done, the practical implementation will in many ways be more evolutionary,” suggested Winchell. ”This effort is not necessarily creating entirely new systems, but leveraging existing initiatives and existing programs in a way that serves the end goal better.”

Attendees agreed that the call to action should be modified to ZPDD: Zero Preventable Deaths and Disability.

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Senator-Elect Duckworth Calls for Better Integrated Trauma Care

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

In a Time magazine opinion piece, Illinois senator-elect Tammy Duckworth and Boston Marathon bombing victim Patrick Downes state their case for establishing a military-civilian trauma care partnership that can save lives.

As a U.S. House member, Duckworth introduced the National Trauma Care System Act this legislative session, which would enact many of the recommendations published in the June 2016 NASEM report, A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury.

Duckworth was traumatically injured when a rocket-propelled grenade hit the Black Hawk helicopter she was piloting over Iraq in 2004, and has championed trauma care and research throughout her tenure in Congress. Her commentary in Time magazine draws well-deserved public attention to this life or death issue.

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NASEM Releases Video Illustrating Need for a National Trauma Care System

Friday, November 18th, 2016

To accompany its June 2016 report calling for improved trauma care in the U.S., the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine created a video that briefly illustrates the report’s main messages. Advances in military  trauma care achieved during the Afghanistan and Iraq wars can be translated to the civilian sector to improve trauma care for all Americans, say the report’s authors. Sustaining these military advances, and closing the gap between the military and civilian sectors, can help to improve trauma care—to protect those the nation sends into harm’s way, and to benefit every American.

View the video HERE.

NIH For Trauma Necessary to Support Civilian Acute Care Needs

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

In an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Todd Rasmussen, MD (DoD Combat Casualty Research Program) and Arthur Kellerman, MD (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences) propose the establishment of an NIH institute dedicated to trauma and emergency care research.

DoD funding represents more than 80 percent of the federal government’s annual investment in trauma care research, the authors point out. “Although this arrangement ensures the military relevance of federal research on trauma care, it provides little support for civilian priorities and leaves the field overly dependent on DoD funding.”

Rasmussen and Kellerman reference the June 2016 report from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, which calls for a National Trauma Action Plan that integrates civilian and military trauma care capabilities. Establishing an NIH for trauma, they contend, will help to “drive the number of preventable deaths after injury down to zero.”

Read the article.