Archive for the ‘Trauma Research Repository’ Category

NTI Is Awarded $4.6M Contract for Repository and Military-Relevant Research

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Research Repository Fact SheetThe National Trauma Institute today announced the award of a $4.6 million Department of Defense Extramural Medical Research grant to develop a National Trauma Research Repository (NTRR) and fund three promising studies with both military and civilian trauma care implications, whose results will be the first to populate the repository.

“Collaboration between military treatment centers and civilian trauma research centers that focuses on combat casualty research priorities is critical to advancing patient care in both military and civilian contexts,” said NTI’s Executive Director Sharon Smith. “With this contract, the DOD is keeping the country’s wounded soldiers as its highest priority by enabling highly qualified civilian trauma centers to continue and add to the work conducted within its Combat Casualty Care Research Program.”

The grant will fund multi-center studies aimed at some significant knowledge gaps, including an evaluation of Ketamine as an alternative to narcotics in treating severe pain following traumatic injury; development of a surgical airway training system to help combat medics, EMT-paramedics, emergency physicians and surgeons develop surgical competency; and a study of a variety of therapies for mitigating vascular trauma injury that results in non-compressible hemorrhage, the leading cause of death on the modern battlefield.

A follow-on to earlier NTI work, a National Trauma Research Repository will enable the synthesis of these and other study data for maximum use. “Because clinical trauma research has largely been accomplished through disconnected efforts, too often these efforts see delays and duplications, inefficiencies and increased costs,” said Dr. Donald Jenkins, the Mayo Clinic’s Director of Trauma, NTI Board member and Principle Investigator on this project. “Among many other benefits, the NTRR will enable repurposing of data to answer additional research questions and provide for pooled data sets with the statistical power necessary to improve statistical significance.

“The ability to make aggregated research data widely available to clinical investigators is critical to reform trauma research and care,” added Jenkins. “While the practice of medicine should be evidence-based, within the field of trauma there is surprisingly little evidence to support clinical practice. A research data repository will ensure maximum utilization of trauma data for translation into evidence-based practice.”

Learn more about the benefits of research repositories.